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All Set To X-Cite! Toyota’s Aygo City Car On Test
Andy Harris, Motoring and Property Editor
The Toyota Aygo shares much of its DNA with the Peugeot 108 and Citroen C1. Each manufacturer is responsible for its car’s styling, the Aygo being the most striking by some way.

The second generation Aygo has been on sale since 2014 and underwent a refresh earlier this year, so time to catch up with Toyota’s smallest car.
Engine choice is simple: a three cylinder 1.0-litre petrol with a heady 71hp. It is mated to a five-speed manual gearbox, which will need plenty of stirring if you are to make decent progress.

The engine is a willing performer, but it does its best work high up the rev range, with maximum torque available at 4,400rpm. It all gets a bit vocal, though there is a rather endearing off-beat three cylinder thrum.

From rest to 62mph will take a yawning 13.8 seconds, but once underway and keeping the revs up, it’s a better story. The long gearing doesn’t help, with a little over 65mph available in second gear... You learn to adapt to the engine’s characteristics and avoid changing up early.

Toyota quotes 68.9mpg for the combined cycle and despite driving the diminutive city car with a certain amount of gusto, the car’s trip computer never reading less than 50mpg. Emissions are just 93g/km CO2, nicely in tune with modern times.

The Aygo’s suspension has been improved and generally does a reasonable job of isolating occupants from all but the very worst road imperfections. High speed stability is good, meaning motorway travel need not be out of bounds. Wind and road noise will dominate and then of course you will be aware of some engine noise too.

Light steering makes the Aygo a doddle to nip about town and with most models boasting a reversing camera, it’s an easy car to park.

Freed from the confines of urban life, high speed corners will induce a little more body roll than is desirable. Safe and secure is the order of the day, though some rivals do offer a more involving driving experience.

Entry-level Aygo models are best avoided, lacking the rather funky 7.0-inch touchscreen that graces all other variants. On test here is the X-Cite, just one notch down from the range-topping X-Clusiv model and on your driveway for £12,975.

Most will be bought on a PCP deal and a quick trawl of Toyota’s website, revealed some excellent Aygo deals. Put down £931 and pay just £169pcm over 42 months, 0% APR. Up the deposit and you can get the payments down to just £99pcm.

Brimming with kit, the X-Cite’s highlights include automatic air conditioning, smart gloss black alloy wheels, LED lighting and much body-coloured interior trim. The aforementioned touchscreen is easy to use and the graphics clear and easy to read.

The Aygo’s driving position is fine, with height adjustability for the driver’s seat. The steering wheel adjusts for rake, the instrument pod moving at the same time. However, taller drivers will bemoan the lack of reach adjustment.

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Four doors makes access to the rear seats a simple task, but taller passengers will not wish to be there for too long, with leg and headroom both lacking. Pop out rear windows are a distinctive touch, but in reality they don’t let in much air.

The boot is a miniscule 168 litres, so it’s reassuring that it is a simple task to drop the rear seats when required.

Build quality is up to the usual excellent Toyota standard and should anything untoward occur, a five-year comprehensive warranty comes as standard.
Running costs should be low, thanks to good economy, group 8A insurance and simple servicing requirements.

I would be inclined to lower my Aygo spend and forgo a few ‘X-Citing’ toys. ‘X-Play’ at £11,375 makes most sense.

Equipped thus, Aygo is highly recommended as a city runabout and will make an ideal first car.

And with that in mind, the observant amongst you will have noticed the rather vibrant paint hue of the test car. ‘Magenta Fizz’ is its grandiose title and I must confess to being somewhat self-conscious behind the wheel. But then again, I’m not the target audience. Other colours are available!

Fast Facts

Toyota Aygo X-Cite
£12,975 on-the-road
998cc 3-cylinder 71hp engine
0 to 62mph in 13.8 seconds
Top speed 99mph
Combined economy 68.9mpg
Emissions 93g/km CO2
VED Band £125
Benefit in kind 19%
Insurance group 8A
5-year/100,000 mile warranty
Servicing 10,000 miles/annually

All Set To X-Cite! Toyota’s Aygo City Car On Test, 20th November 2018, 11:10 AM