search
Barnsley
Batley
Bedale
Beverley
Bingley
Bradford
Bridlington
Brighouse
Castleford
Catterick Garrison
Cleckheaton
Cottingham
Darlington
Dewsbury
Doncaster
Driffield
Elland
Filey
Goole
Guisborough
Halifax
Harrogate
Hawes
Hebden Bridge
Heckmondwike
Hessle
Holmfirth
Huddersfield
Hull
Ilkley
Keighley
Knaresborough
Knottingley
Leeds
Leyburn
Liversedge
Malton
Mexborough
Middlesborough
Mirfield
Morley
Normanton
Northallerton
Ossett
Otley
Pickering
Pontetfract
Pudsey
Redcar
Richmond
Ripon
Rotherham
Saltburn-by-the-Sea
Scarborough
Selby
Settle
Sheffield
Shipley
Skipton
Sowerby Bridge
Stockton-on-Tees
Tadcaster
Thirsk
Todmorden
Wakefield
Wetherby
Whitby
Yarm
York
Enjoying Summer The Jaguar Way. F-Type Convertible On Test
Andy Harris, Motoring and Property Editor
2013 saw the arrival of the new F-TYPE, a spiritual successor for the iconic E-TYPE.

Over the last few years I have managed to drive the F-TYPE in various guises, from a V6 Coupe to a snorting SVR and all have provided thrills aplenty.

However even a company renowned for producing sports cars is not immune to ever increasing emissions legislation, hence the roll-out across the range of new Ingenium petrol engines.

These downsized engines are turbocharged to maintain performance, yet lower emissions and better mpg is the by-product.

Jaguar recently slotted just such a 2.0-litre engine into the F-TYPE which seemed a good enough excuse to book one in for extending testing. As luck would have it, the car arrived during one of the warmest weeks so far this summer – so pleased I eschewed the attractive coupe for the convertible.

The turbocharged 2.0-litre engine produces a not inconsiderable 300PS and 400Nm of torque at just 1500rpm. Mated to Jaguar’s familiar eight-speed automatic gearbox, the F-TYPE is no sluggard. The sprint from 0 to 60mph can be accomplished in just 5.4 seconds and top speed is 155mph.

Up until now, all the F-TYPE engines boasted a supercharger for instant enhanced performance and if I’m being picky you can sense a slight delay with the 2.0-litre motor whilst the turbo spools up. It’s more noticeable at low speeds, but once on the move it becomes less of an issue. Selecting ‘Sport’ mode holds the gears for longer and was my default setting for all but town driving.

The gearbox is a smooth operator and although steering wheel paddles are fitted, I saw little reason to use them.

Also by Andy Harris...
Mustang On Manoeuvres
The Dawning Of A Fine Rolls-Royce Weekend
Volkswagen Up The Ante With New GTI
Mazda6 Makeover - So What’s New?
Kuga On The Prowl – A Week With Ford’s Popular SUV
One of the other benefits of the downsized engine is a reduction in weight. Find a series of challenging bends and the F-TYPE feels lighter and more nimble than its more powerful stable mates. As such, the open-top Jag makes a mighty fine cross-country tool, only its width being a slight hindrance on some of the narrow country lanes that make up my test routes.

The F-TYPE boasts a firm, yet pliant ride, and only the deepest potholes manage to upset the calm of the cabin. The rather lovely optional 19-inch Split-Spoke alloy wheels won’t have helped.

What price looks? (Well an extra £1,575 if you are asking...).

Jaguar quotes 39.2mpg for the combined cycle and I would suggest that 32/33mpg is readily achievable with a gentle right foot. I am not so blessed, but still recorded 28mpg during a hard-charging week.

Emissions are a reasonably low 163g/km CO2, of special interest to those able to run an F-TYPE as a company car.

As one would expect, the F-TYPE is well equipped. On top of the £59,085 list price, a further £8,235 of options had been fitted.

I could probably live without the beefier brakes (£2,290), the aforementioned alloy wheels and the red brake callipers (£320). Let’s just say there is plenty of scope to personalise an F-TYPE.

So what of the Jaguar’s interior? The seats are comfortable, readily adjustable and extremely supportive. Roof down with the wind deflector fitted, the cabin remains reasonably hushed even at motorway speeds and on colder days, heated seats and a powerful heater means that there is no excuse not to drop the top all year round.

The electric hood is quick to operate and red is a great choice of colour contrasting nicely with white paintwork.

Do be prepared to travel light, as the boot is a little on the small side. A selection of squashy bags rather than a suitcase would be most appropriate.
Are there any other downsides to the smaller engined F-TYPE? It would be fair to say that the V6 and V8 engines do make a nicer sound, but nothing else springs to mind.

My week with the Jaguar passed all too quickly. Widely admired wherever I went, the F-TYPE still has the ability to turn heads, even after five years on sale.

The 2.0-litre engine is almost as quick as the larger V-engines in the real world, yet should prove to be more affordable to run.

I wouldn’t say no...

Fast Facts

Jaguar F-TYPE Convertible R-Dynamic
Price £59,085
Yulong white with red roof
Four cylinder 2.0-litre turbocharged engine
300PS and 400Nm of torque
8-speed automatic transmission
0-60mph in 5.4 seconds
Top speed 155mph
Combined economy 39.2mpg
Emissions 163g/km CO2

Enjoying Summer The Jaguar Way. F-Type Convertible On Test, 23rd July 2018, 18:20 PM