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Have You Spotted An Asian Hornet?
Asian hornet
The Asian hornet (Vespa velutina) is a species of hornet which is not native to the UK. It is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than other hornets or bees.

However, they do pose a risk to honey bees and pollinating insects. This is why we are keen to stop this insect establishing in the UK, and why you should report suspected sightings.

When a sighting is confirmed, experts from the National Bee Unit (NBU) and the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) will work quickly to find and destroy any active nests in the area.

Current situation

To date, there have been nine confirmed sightings of the Asian hornet in England and five nests have been destroyed.

Seven of these sightings occurred in 2018; an individual hornet in Lancashire (April) and Hull , three in Cornwall and two in Hampshire (all September).

It is crucial you report any possible sightings so our experts can take quick and effective action to eradicate Asian hornets.

Nicola Spence, Chief Plant Health Officer, said:

"These sightings in Liskeard and Hull underline the need to remain vigilant. I want to encourage people to look out for any Asian hornet nests and if you think you’ve spotted one, please report your sighting through the Asian hornet app or online.

"By ensuring we are alerted to possible sightings as early as possible, we can take swift and effective action to stamp out the threat posed by Asian hornets.

"While the Asian hornet poses no greater risk to human health than a bee, we recognise the damage they can cause to honey bee colonies and other beneficial insects.

"Please continue to look out for any Asian hornets and if you think you’ve spotted one, report your sighting through the Asian hornet app or online."

How to spot an Asian hornet

Asian hornets:

have a dark brown or black velvety body
have a yellow or orange band on fourth segment of abdomen
have yellow tipped legs
are smaller than the native European hornet
are not active at night

Asian hornet - photo by Gilles San Martin
Report any suspect sightings

If you suspect you have seen an Asian hornet you should report this using the iPhone and Android app ‘Asian Hornet Watch’ or by emailing alertnonnative@ceh.ac.uk

Visiting countries where Asian hornet is widespread

The Asian hornet is native to China but arrived in Europe in 2004 and is now widespread in parts of France, Spain, the Channel Islands and Portugal.

It presents no greater risk to human health than a bee so there is no need for you to take extra precautions in these countries.

However, there have been cases where Asian hornets have been found in bags or camping equipment of travellers returning from those countries, particularly in spring and late autumn.

Before returning to the UK you should check your luggage, especially if it’s been kept outside during your trip. If you do spot an Asian hornet on your return to the UK you should report it with the dates and places you went on holiday, and ideally a photo of the insect.

For more information go to:
https://www.gov.uk/government/news/asian-hornet-uk-sightings-in-2018

Have You Spotted An Asian Hornet?, 29th September 2018, 12:17 PM