search
Barnsley
Batley
Bedale
Beverley
Bingley
Bradford
Bridlington
Brighouse
Castleford
Catterick Garrison
Cleckheaton
Cottingham
Darlington
Dewsbury
Doncaster
Driffield
Elland
Filey
Goole
Guisborough
Halifax
Harrogate
Hawes
Hebden Bridge
Heckmondwike
Hessle
Holmfirth
Huddersfield
Hull
Ilkley
Keighley
Knaresborough
Knottingley
Leeds
Leyburn
Liversedge
Malton
Mexborough
Middlesborough
Mirfield
Morley
Normanton
Northallerton
Ossett
Otley
Pickering
Pontetfract
Pudsey
Redcar
Richmond
Ripon
Rotherham
Saltburn-by-the-Sea
Scarborough
Selby
Settle
Sheffield
Shipley
Skipton
Sowerby Bridge
Stockton-on-Tees
Tadcaster
Thirsk
Todmorden
Wakefield
Wetherby
Whitby
Yarm
York
Nutrition, Hydration And Dementia
It's Nutrition and Hydration Week 2017!

According to the creators, this global challenge "aims to highlight, promote and celebrate improvements in the provision of nutrition and hydration locally, nationally and globally."

This week, organisations and sectors around the world are encouraged to demonstrate their commitment to supporting improvements in nutrition and hydration for the global community.

There are many issues surrounding nutrition and hydration for people with Dementia.

Maintaining healthy levels of nutrition and hydration is crucial for people with dementia, however, they often struggle to eat and drink enough.

Dehydration and insufficient nutrition levels can lead to many problems including increased confusion, loss of muscle strength and greater risk for infection and illness. Lack of nutrients can even cause the symptoms of dementia to significantly worsen.

Ensuring that a person with dementia eats a healthy, balanced diet will help them retain their physical and mental abilities for longer.

A crucial tip to reduce or avoid eating and drinking issues for people with dementia is to use appropriately coloured crockery.

Experts say that people with dementia are more likely to finish their food and put on weight when their meal is served on yellow and blue crockery.

Dianne Smith, a matron for dementia at the University Hospitals of Morecambe Bay NHS Foundation Trust, said:
"People with dementia often experience visual problems, including not being able to distinguish between different colours."

She continues:
"If the crockery is a similar colour to the food being served then a person with dementia may not be able to see the contrast and recognise the food that is there to be eaten."

Being able to feed themselves properly helps people with dementia feel more confident and independent - Restoring their dignity.

Emma Smyth, a nurse manager at St. Cuthbert's Nursing home, said:
"Since the introduction of coloured crockery, some patients have had their dignity restored as they have been able to feed themselves again and enjoy their meal."

Pledge your support for Nutrition and Hydration Week, or get in contact - info@nutritionandhydrationweek.co.uk

Article written by Madison McCormack, Marketing Assistant at Find Memory Care

Nutrition, Hydration And Dementia, 16th March 2017, 9:30 AM