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Sleep Experts – Tips On Avoiding Jet Lag
Dr Neil Stanley
A sleep expert has given a series of top tips to long haul flyers who suffer from jet lag.

Dr Neil Stanley worked In the Neurosciences Division of the Royal Air Force Institute of Aviation Medicine which, in early 80s, had one of the best sleep laboratories in Europe. Its experts pioneered research into jet-lag and shift-work.

Dr Stanley said: “Every year many of us eagerly wait for our summer holiday to arrive. Getting organised for all elements of the trip is a given but do we ever think about the inevitable jet lag that we will have to face as a result of long distance travel?”

Jet lag occurs when travelling across multiple time zones, meaning our usual body rhythms fall out of sync with new time zones.

“As a general rule of thumb, it can take a whole day to recover for each time zone that you cross - it could take up to an entire week to get back into your routine after a flight from New York to London, for example.

“Regardless of whether you’re a frequent traveller, jet lag is something that most of us will experience in our lifetime.

“Adjust your watch to your destination’s time once you board the plane; this way your mind will start to believe the time it says.

If you are on an overnight flight, eat something before you board the aircraft which should hopefully increase chances of being able to sleep on the plane.

On a daytime flight, attempt to get a window seat and then keep blinds open until it gets dark – this way you will be more likely to stay awake at the correct times.

If it is light when you arrive at your destination, go outside for a walk and fresh air, try to stay awake until it’s dark and follow your normal bedtime routine.

On the flip side, if it is dark, go to bed as soon as you can and set an alarm to wake up at your desired time in the morning.

Consume meals at the correct local time and avoid drinking excess alcohol, especially on the flight, since dehydration is thought to make jet lag worse.

If at all possible, do not drive or organise important meetings immediately after a long haul flight and take half a day or a day to adjust to the new time zone,” he said.

Sleep Experts – Tips On Avoiding Jet Lag, 24th August 2018, 19:49 PM