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Starting Big School – Top Tips For Learning Letter Sounds
Jo and Lisa, Early Years Professionals
Chosen letters on a keyring
In order to read successfully children have to be able to blend sounds together in words. They therefore need to be able to hear and say the precise pronunciation for each letter sound. For children to hear these pure sounds the adult needs to model them correctly.

When introducing children to letter sounds it is important to aim for a fun and informal approach. Here are some top tips that we hope will help in this process.

Top Tips

When learning letter sounds it is crucial to use lower case letters initially, the only exception is the first letter of your child’s name.
Only concentrate on a few letters your child is working on at any one time. These are often the letters in their name and most schools will start with s-a-t-p-i-n.
Keep familiar letters with new letters to give the opportunity for revision and to build up your child’s confidence.
Linking letter sounds to pictures can give children an anchor point, so ‘c’ ‘cat’. This also lays the foundations for when children are learning initial sounds in words ready for reading and writing them.
Display these letters around in the environment so that there is daily exposure to them.
It is important that you progress at the rate set by your child.
Little and often at these early stages is the best approach.
Involve the whole family.
Any reluctance may indicate that a child is not developmentally ready for a stage, work at their pace.
Make activities fun by incorporating the learning into games, treasure hunts, sound walks and daily activities.
Involve your child in normal everyday reading activities such as spotting the letters whilst supermarket shopping.
Have the chosen letters attached to a keyring, this makes them accessible and portable at all times. It also gives your child a sense of ownership.
Learning to read and write is not a race but a lifelong skill. It is a complex skill involving many steps. The adult’s role is to support and praise every attempt, effort and achievement however small!!

Jo and Lisa can be contacted through their website: www.readysteadyschool.co.uk

Starting Big School – Top Tips For Learning Letter Sounds, 10th October 2018, 9:56 AM