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Take A Stroll Around Nature's Bluebell Spectacle This Spring
Sun shining through Bluebell wood - photo by Neil Aldridge
If you would like to catch one of nature's finest spectacles then seek out a bluebell woodland over the next few weeks and you won't be disappointed.

Ahead of the trees gaining their full complement of green leaves, woodland floors have sprung into life with woodland flowers. And there is one everybody is sure to recognise - our beloved bluebell.

With sunlight still able to hit the forest floor bluebells literally explode across many woodlands here in Yorkshire. The next couple of weeks will be the best time to see them in full bloom. With sheer numbers and their distinct colour they transform a woodland into a place like no other for a few precious weeks of the year.

Nature's timing couldn't be more perfect; bluebells appear on the scene just prior to the woodland floor being shaded out by the leafy canopy and provides welcome nectar for the many insects such as hoverflies, bees and butterflies on the wing at this time of year.

Brimstone butterfly on a bluebell - photo by PapaPiper
Brimstone butterfly is one to keep an eye out for. This large, pale yellow butterfly is one of the first to wake from its winter hibernation and will drink the nectar form bluebells to replenish its energy stores.

You may notice not all woodlands have bluebells. Bluebells are slow to spread and therefore only tend to put on a large spectacle in very old woodlands, where you may even be able to smell their subtle sweet scent.

As the UK is home to more than half the world's population of the bluebell it's vital we take time to appreciate and care for these wonderful woodland flowers.

Bluebells - photo by Elizabeth Gomm
With the help of volunteers Yorkshire Wildlife Trust looks after many wonderful reserves where you can see bluebells; these include Hetchell Wood in Leeds, North Cliffe Woods near Market Weighton, Moorlands Nature Reserve in York, Potteric Carr near Doncaster and Garbutt Wood Nature Reserve near Thirsk.

Remember, bluebells are a protected species in the UK and therefore you shouldn't dig them up or pick them.

Let Yorkshire Wildlife Trust know what you have seen and where by taking a picture and posting it on their Facebook wall or tweeting them @YorksWildlife.

Why not make everyday a little wild by taking the 30 Days Wild challenge this June?

For more information visit the Trust's website www.ywt.org.uk
Take A Stroll Around Nature's Bluebell Spectacle This Spring, 1st May 2017, 19:31 PM