search
Barnsley
Batley
Bedale
Beverley
Bingley
Bradford
Bridlington
Brighouse
Castleford
Catterick Garrison
Cleckheaton
Cottingham
Darlington
Dewsbury
Doncaster
Driffield
Elland
Filey
Goole
Guisborough
Halifax
Harrogate
Hawes
Hebden Bridge
Heckmondwike
Hessle
Holmfirth
Huddersfield
Hull
Ilkley
Keighley
Knaresborough
Knottingley
Leeds
Leyburn
Liversedge
Malton
Mexborough
Middlesborough
Mirfield
Morley
Normanton
Northallerton
Ossett
Otley
Pickering
Pontetfract
Pudsey
Redcar
Richmond
Ripon
Rotherham
Saltburn-by-the-Sea
Scarborough
Selby
Settle
Sheffield
Shipley
Skipton
Sowerby Bridge
Stockton-on-Tees
Tadcaster
Thirsk
Todmorden
Wakefield
Wetherby
Whitby
Yarm
York
Why Naming And Shaming Adulterers Is A Great Leap Backwards
Peter Jones, Lawyer
ThePointer photo by Gabe Austin
The government's new divorce form, aimed at making the process more user-friendly, is more likely to backfire by increasing conflict and lengthening the time a divorce takes.

The updated online form includes a space for those applying for a divorce to name who their spouse has committed adultery with. Once named, the third party is tied up in the court case, sent copies of the paperwork and given an opportunity to respond. Failure to reply can delay proceedings and rack up more costs.

Although the naming is not compulsory, many commentators rightly predict it will lead to a rise in shaming third parties as 'wronged partners' publicly vilify their love rivals.

Also by Peter Jones...
Judge's 'Dear Sam' Letter Opens Wider Issue On Simplifying Court Judgements To Teenagers
How To Move Forward From Your Divorce With A Smile
How To Approach The Thorny Issue Of Pensions When Divorcing
Birds Nest Custody Can Be a Soaring Success But Beware Of The Pitfalls
Why Grandparents Are Vital For Families Going Through Divorce
The supposed advancement is a major setback following the hard work and commitment in recent years of courts, responsible legal practices and support agencies to settle family disputes non-confrontationally.

The invitation to name and shame flies in the face of this and, although retaliating in this way might provide a short-term lift, it is unhelpful in the long run - especially where children are involved.

A more constructive way forward is a collaborative approach to divorce and family matters which follow the code of practice set out by Resolution (a group of family lawyers and other professionals) to avoid costly, public and stressful litigation.

Even if issues are particularly complex and need a judge or an arbitrator to make a decision, a lawyer who follows Resolution's code of practice will avoid an unnecessarily aggressive route wherever possible.

Not only will this approach save much time, stress and cost by avoiding a court battle, it allows couples to concentrate on what is really important; ensuring that children's interests are best served; reaching a fair settlement for both sides; and being able to move on afterwards without lingering bitterness and resentment.

Why Naming And Shaming Adulterers Is A Great Leap Backwards, 27th September 2017, 8:54 AM