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Yorkshire Times
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Graham Clark
Music Features Writer
@Maxximum23Clark
1:00 AM 16th March 2024
arts
Review

Albums: Paloma Faith – The Glorification Of Sadness

 
Paloma Faith – The Glorification Of Sadness

Sweatpants; Pressure; God In A Dress; How You Leave A Man; There’s Nothing More Human Than Failure; Bad Woman; Cry On The Dancefloor; Say My Name; Let It Ride; The Big Bang Ending; Eat Shit And Die; Divorce; Hate When You’re Happy; Enjoy Yourself; I Am Enough; Mirror To Mirror; Already Broken

(RCA) 19658864672


Anyone expecting a smooth ride with Paloma Faith’s sixth album could be in for a bumpy ride as the singer bares her emotions on a soulful and emotional set of songs.

Presented in chronological order, the songs take the listener on a journey through the experience of leaving a long-term relationship; the lyrics are direct and striking yet honest. “Will you still love me when I’m old and no longer young?” she asks Sweatpants.

The album has a number of different producers, which results in a fusion of styles that otherwise might have seemed to result in an incoherent style; instead, it gives the impression of where Faith’s mindset was at the time she wrote these personal songs.

There are upbeat tracks like How You Leave A Man, where she sounds confident and in control, while on Cry On The Dancefloor, she offers an uplifting stance on matters. On the other hand, Divorce is an intense and emotional song where she shares her feelings.

Anyone who has seemed Faith live will know that there is always an element of humour that she shares again here on Eat Shit and Die in an uplifting triumphant moment.

The album is a hefty listen in one go, and you might feel emotionally drained at some points, but those who persevere will be rewarded with a story of sadness being turned around into a confident and assured outcome.