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Bat Carers - An Introduction
Claire Storey, Wildlife Correspondent
Noctule bat - photo by Claire Storey
I am thrilled to be writing my first article for Yorkshire Times nature page. I am secretary to East Yorkshire Bat Group, a licensed bat carer and volunteer bat roost visitor. When I am not undertaking voluntary bat work, I work as a Government Adviser for the Natural Environment in England, specifically protecting and enhancing the environment.

In the UK there are 17 breeding species of bats and at some time or another some of these bats need a helping hand. For instance:

During the summer, some young bats (pups and/or juveniles) are learning the ropes of flying and sometimes they get it wrong!

The equipment needed to contain a Bat and the telephone number for the National Bat Helpline (0345 1300 228)
During the autumn bats feast on midge, moths and other small flying insects in order to help them survive the long cold winters, when they go into torpor. It can take up to 30% of their fat reserves arousing from torpor in the winter period (which they can often do). When they finally emerge from their hibernation sites in the spring, some are inevitably weak, thin and dehydrated.

At these times human intervention is required by bat carers.

There are bat carers all over the country. The Bat Conservation Trust (BCT) coordinates the list of bat carers and gives out contact details to members of the public who find these grounded and stranded bats.

If you find a grounded bat, it is important that the bat is contained prior to a carer arriving.

BCT have very clear advice on how to contain a bat on this web page: https://www.bats.org.uk/advice/help-with-injured-grounded-bat/how-to-contain-a-bat

More Bat care advice will follow next week.



Help Our Bats

East Yorkshire Bat Group (EYBG, https://eastyorkshirebatgroup.wordpress.com/join-east-yorkshire-bat-group/) is a voluntary organisation and one of 90 similar county-based bat conservation groups in the UK.

EYBG is a partner group with the BCT and work in partnership with Natural England.

We have a number of bat boxes schemes across East Yorkshire and some in North Yorkshire too.

We offer advice, education (bat talks), hold records of bat roosts, offer training to members and most importantly help to conserve and protect East Yorkshire bat populations.

Also by Claire Storey...
Caring For Bats


Bat Carers - An Introduction, 17th March 2019, 16:01 PM