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New T-cross From Volkswagen
Andy Harris, Motoring and Property Editor
Volkswagen are on a mission to offer an SUV in every sector. So far, we have Touareg, Tiguan Allspace, Tiguan, T-Roc and now T-Cross, the smallest member of this burgeoning family. Is this overkill or just a response to consumer demand?

After a week behind the wheel, you can read my thoughts.

But first, here are a few facts about the car I have been piloting:

Volkswagen T-Cross SEL
Price from £21,655 (£23,145 as tested)
115PS 1.0-litre 3-cylinder engine
Six-speed manual gearbox
0-62mph in 10.2 seconds
Top speed 120mph
Emissions – 112g/km CO2
Combined economy 48.2mpg
Insurance group 12E

Despite being the junior member of the Volkswagen SUV club, there is a surprising amount of room inside. Four adults will find plenty of room to spread and there are a decent 385 litres of luggage space for their chattels. The rear seats can be slid forward to increase this to 455 litres.

Furthermore, if you don’t specify a spare wheel (and I believe you should), there is a huge under floor compartment for more detritus.

All this space did set me wondering why anyone would choose the ‘bigger’ T-Roc, as it does not offer a great deal more room.

There is also a slight anomaly here too, as one would expect T-Cross to appeal to those seeking a first step on the SUV ladder and as such, perhaps a younger audience. But it is T-Roc that can be specced in a variety of vibrant hues both inside and out, more suited to the youthful buyer.

Behind the wheel the T-Cross offers a familiar Volkswagen driving experience. The controls are well weighted, the driving position comfortable and the view out a little elevated over a standard hatch.

The 1.0-litre engine pulls with gusto and offers more than enough performance for this type of vehicle.

Driven without economy in mind, I recorded over 50mpg during a week which included city running and motorway cruising. Impressive stuff and with low CO2 emissions, the T-Cross boasts excellent green credentials. No diesel engine necessary here.

Released from the confines of the city, the T-Cross cuts a reasonable dash on faster country roads and generally offers a firm but comfortable ride.

All models in the range are well equipped and boast as standard an eight-inch touchscreen and a raft of safety features including Blind Spot Detection, City Emergency Braking and Rear Traffic Alert Systems.

It is anticipated that SE trim will be the most popular, powered by the 115PS 1.0-litre engine. I suspect they are correct. A little under £20,000 will be needed. Pay more if you must have all the trinkets…

I think it is safe to say that Volkswagen has now covered all bases with regards to its SUV offerings and the latest diminutive member is a worthy edition.

Also by Andy Harris...
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New T-cross From Volkswagen, 8th October 2019, 13:19 PM