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Peregrine Chicks Hatch At Malham
Long distance shot of one of this year's breeding peregrine adults at Malham taken on 19 April. Photo by Dave Dimmock
No one has seen them, but it’s certain that peregrine falcon chicks have hatched high up on Malham Cove. In the past few days adult birds have been carrying food to a nest site.

Peregrines have a history of being persecuted in the Dales, but this marks at least the 22nd time that a pair has hatched chicks at Malham since the birds returned there in 1993.

People can witness the world’s fastest animal in action by visiting a free public viewpoint located at the base of the Cove. Staff and volunteers from the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority (YDNPA) and the RSPB are on hand to assist with telescopes and information from 10:30 to 16:30 five days a week from Thursday to Monday.

The chicks received a feast of headless pigeon. Photo by Dave Dimmock
RSPB Area Manager Anthony Hills said: “We’re excited to have seen behaviour that suggests the peregrines are feeding chicks. The next few weeks are going to bring lots of exciting activity as the parents catch food for their hungry young ones, and of course it won’t be long before these chicks are ready to take their first tentative flights. I’d highly recommend a trip up to the Cove viewpoint to see these birds in action and to get the latest updates from the staff and volunteers.”

YDNPA Wildlife Conservation Officer Ian Court added: “The nest site is out of sight, so we don’t know how many eggs or chicks there are. But the adults have been seen taking food to the next ledge, which means they are definitely feeding young. The male bird is also keeping particularly careful watch over the nest site.”

Peregrine Chicks Hatch At Malham, 18th May 2019, 9:05 AM